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Monday, March 18, 2013

Lucky or Fortunate

I have a talent for finding four-leaf-clovers. Sometimes I leave them in their patch, but most times I carefully bring them home, press them in waxed paper, and store them in large books. Sometimes I share them with others. But I do not think they really bring luck. A wise mentor in my life refrained from wishing others luck, believing that we make our own circumstances what they are. Still, there are times when I wonder.

Take Josie Moraine, the main character in OUT OF THE EASY, the latest book by Ruta Sepetys. The daughter of a prostitute, she grows up in New Orleans, cared for by Willie, the madame who runs her mother's brothel. She lives in a small room above a bookstore in the Quarter in exchange for working at the shop. In addition, she spends every morning cleaning at the house for Willie. Despite her circumstances, Josie has maintained excellent grades in high school and hopes to attend college. The girl has not been lucky. I cannot imagine her even using the word.

Yet she is loved deeply by Charlie, the bookstore owner, and his son Patrick, by Sadie, the mute cook at the house, by Cokie, the driver of Willie's enormous Cadillac named Mariah, by Jesse, a young man who watches out for her on the streets, and especially by Willie herself. Most of what occurs in her life is out of Josie's control. Still, she plans and works and negotiates, hoping to change the course of her life. She appreciates all the ways she has been fortunate.

8 comments:

  1. I am rereading Frankl's book, Man's Search for Meaning, and Josie sounds like a successful student of his theory, known as logotherapy, as she finds meaning in life.

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    1. Something new to me, Kate. I have never read Frankl's work.

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  2. i'm curious about how Josie's story plays out. you've done a good job of teasing us into wanting to read. aren't we "lucky" to be following your blog...

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    1. You would really appreciate this book, Brattcat.

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  3. When I was a wee child, I found one and ate it to keep with me forever. I wish I could REALLY say I've been lucky since.
    ps. They taste terrible!
    hahahaha

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    1. Never have I eaten one! I might have wondered in my early years if that act transferred the luck to me.

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  4. Love your presentation of this book, Madame Jewel, it's one I would like. I think perhaps the luckiest thing of all is when someone is loved in childhood.

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    1. Completely agree. I am glad so many people loved me as a girl.

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